The UCC 'Model of Cancer-Care'

Research and discussion with several cancer patients, families, friends and medical professionals lead to development of this '360° Care' service for the patient as well as their near and dear ones.

UCC Model of Care

Timely, Prompt and Affirmative Action

Every UCC Care-personnel is selected and specifically trained to handle physical, psychological, social and dispense special 'comfort' programs to ensure all round emotional comfort to all effected.

About UCC

The UCC Model of care is Unique

Concierge, Care-giver, Active listener, Coordinator, Assistant, Doctors, Hospitals, Emotional Support : Single point of Contact for any cancer patient.

Contact UCC

State-of-the-art Infrastructure

UCC team regularly monitors new and emerging medical pharma and technology inorder to facilitate the needy patients and address their type of cancer treatment correctly.

FAQ's

If you are reading this, We know what you feel. From the moment the diagnosis for cancer is positive, panic sets in. The unspeakable, unthinkable, unbearable pain of the dreaded word 'cancer' begins to shake the foundations of living. But, the reality is - cancer can be conquered. Many forms of cancer have cure available and for the other types, cure and remedy are perhaps being found every minute of the day by specialists and passionate researchers. Science and Pharma won over Polio, Small Pox, Ebola! It is just a matter of time before Cancer is Conquered.

The FAQs are just indicative - as simple education to understand and realise that like any other illness cancer is just one more. Yes, it can be cured, if detected in time, and treated appropriately.

There are 3 sections of FAQ available for your understanding. Please click on the links to learn more.

  • 1. About Cancer
  • 2. About Universal Cancer Conquest (UCC)
  • 3. Other important questions to ASK your doctor

Being told you have cancer, can be scary and stressful. You probably have a lot of questions, concerns and worries. Learning about the disease, how it’s treated, and is important to live through the path of recovery - a lot to do on your own and your near and dear ones.

Any website can give you general information about the cancer and its treatment, but your doctor and care-giving team is the best source of information about your situation. It’s important for you to be able to talk frankly and openly with your cancer-care team.

Cancer is not just one disease but a group of more than 100 diseases that share a common trait — they all start when abnormal cells live longer than they should and grow out of control. As they continue dividing, abnormal cancer cells usually form a lump or mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors grow locally and can be removed. They do not spread to other areas in the body. Malignant tumors, however, are composed of cancerous cells that can break away and travel through the blood stream or lymph system to other parts of the body. This is called metastasis. Most cancers are named for the organ or type of cell in which they start, and they continue to be called by that name even if they spread from their original location to another organ or region of the body.

You don’t have to get old to get cancer. Anyone can get cancer. Babies, Teens, Adolescents, Adults or Seniors. While some cancers are more closely associated with specific age groups, cancer can affect people of any age, from children through seniors. It also affects people of all genders, races, socio-economic status and education levels.

No one really knows how or why some individuals get cancer and others do not. Researchers are continuing to look into the precise reasons. Cancer is caused by both external (chemicals, radiation and viruses) and internal (hormones, immune conditions and inherited mutations) factors. Genetics, environment, stress, and unhealthy habits like smoking are potential risk factors.

Genetics refers to the genes in our bodies that may want to produce cells that will grow into cancer. Only a few cancers are known to be genetic.

Environmental factors that may lead to cancer can include the many chemicals we live and work around. Some of these chemicals are known to cause cancer; therefore we as a society have made an effort to stop using them. Chemicals serve many important functions, however, such as helping crops grow healthy, keeping food safe, running our cars. It is impossible to get rid of all of chemicals, so we choose to live with some amount of risk.

Stress may cause cells to grow abnormally by changing the way the chemicals inside our bodies work. We're not sure about all of the relationships between our feelings and our bodies, but it is commonly believed that people under extreme amounts of stress get sick more often.

Smoking has been related to many types of cancers including lung, neck and mouth cancer. Passive smoking – being in an area where people smoke and you inhale the smoke, is also a known reason for some types of cancer. Scientists are looking at other things we do, like the foods we eat, to see if other such habits affect whether or not we get cancer.

Any and every part of the internal and external body is susceptible to cancer. Bones, muscles, skin, tissues, Brain, eyes, breast, lungs, gastro-intestinal, nose and the like. It is not very uncommon for men to have breast cancer.
Cancer often causes symptoms that you can watch for. The word CAUTION can remind you of the most common warning signs of cancer:
  • Change in bowel or bladder habits
  • A sore that does not heal
  • Unusual bleeding or discharge
  • Thickening or lump in the breast or any other part of the body
  • Indigestion or difficulty swallowing
  • Obvious change in a wart or mole
  • Nagging cough or hoarseness

These symptoms are not always warning signs of cancer. They can also be caused by less serious conditions. It is important to see a doctor if you have any of these symptoms. Only a doctor can make a diagnosis. Don’t wait to feel pain because early cancer usually does not cause pain.

A biopsy is the only sure way to know whether a medical problem is cancer. In a biopsy, the doctor removes a sample of tissue. The tissue is examined under a microscope to check for cancer cells.

Although there are many types of cancer, they can be grouped into broad categories. The main categories include:

Carcinoma, cancer that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover internal organs. Sarcoma, cancer that begins in bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. Leukemia, cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow and causes large numbers of abnormal blood cells to be produced and enter the blood. Lymphoma and myeloma, cancers that begin in the cells of the immune system. Central nervous system cancers, cancers that begin in the tissues of the brain and spinal cord.

Depending on the type of cancer and research status, cancer is treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, radioactive substances or immunotherapy. The doctor may use one method or a combination of methods. The choice of treatment depends on the type and location of the cancer, whether the disease has spread, the patient’s age and general health, and other factors.

The treatment options include:

Chemotherapy, the use of drugs to destroy cancer cells or slow the spread of cancer. Radiation therapy, the use X-rays or other high-energy rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Surgery, a common method for treating certain kinds of cancer that appear to be locally contained. It involves the removal of a tumor and nearby tissue that may contain cancer cells. Hormone therapy, which alters the levels of hormones in the body. Immunotherapy, or biologic response modifier therapy, the use of the body's natural immune system to help fight cancer. Bone marrow and stem cell transplants, used mostly for cancers of the blood and lymph system (leukemia and lymphoma) and some solid tumors (breast and ovarian). If your doctor feels you are a candidate for a transplant, you will be referred to a transplant treatment center.

Many cancer patients take part in clinical trials (research studies) testing new treatment methods. Such studies are designed to improve cancer treatment.

Cancer stages describe the extent of the disease in a given individual. "Staging" a cancer is important to the care team because it helps doctors to plan a person's treatment, estimate the person's prognosis (likely outcome or course of the disease), and identify clinical trials (research studies) that may be suitable for a particular patient. Although there are finer designations within each stage, here are the basic stages:

Stage 0 — Early cancer that is present only in the layer of cells in which it began.

Stage I, Stage II, and Stage III — Higher numbers indicate more extensive disease: greater tumor size, and/or spread of the cancer to nearby lymph nodes and/or organs adjacent to the primary tumor.

Stage IV — The cancer has spread to another organ.

Cancer is a group of diseases. In total there are more than 100 different types of cancers. Cancers are also caused by different things, so no one strategy can prevent them. Likewise, different cancers respond to different treatments, so no one treatment can cure them all. Treating cancer is further complicated due to the lifestyle and attitude of patients, the different physiology of people and the rate their bodies will metabolise drugs, the blood supply to the tumour affecting the drug getting into the tumour, the tumour physiology and the fact that the tumour can continue to change.
A hundred years ago, cancer was most always fatal. But not today. Many types of cancers are relatively easy to treat, and there is little chance that they will re-occur. One of the best steps than anyone can take is to undergo regular check-ups with their physician. The earlier that cancer is detected, the faster treatment can begin. Thus, the likelihood for a better outcome is also increased.
Learning that they have cancer one of the most significant moments that people will ever experience. From that moment, there are so many questions to ask, fears to face, decisions to make and treatments to undergo, you may worry that your life will never be the same. In some ways, it won’t. You will always be a person who has or who had cancer. But that doesn’t mean that you must stop doing the things that you enjoy or spending time with the people that you love. We encourage people to remember that cancer is something that they have-it’s not who they are. And we make every effort to help our patients return to the life and lifestyle they’ve always had as soon as possible.
Second only to learning that you have cancer yourself is the difficulty of telling your family and close friends about it. They are likely to have many of the same questions and fears that you do, and will want to help, but may be unsure how. Be honest with them, share how you’re feeling, and let them do the same. Ask them for help if you need it-most will be more than grateful for the chance. When you can, keep life as normal as possible. And if you’re struggling with telling people, or with their reactions to it, consider working with a counselor who can help you do so. Talking with other cancer patients and survivors may also provide the support you need, and there are also support groups for spouses, friends and family of people with cancer.
Learning that they have cancer one of the most significant moments that people will ever experience. From that moment, there are so many questions to ask, fears to face, decisions to make and treatments to undergo, you may worry that your life will never be the same. In some ways, it won’t. You will always be a person who has or who had cancer. But that doesn’t mean that you must stop doing the things that you enjoy or spending time with the people that you love. We encourage people to remember that cancer is something that they have-it’s not who they are. And we make every effort to help our patients return to the life and lifestyle they’ve always had as soon as possible.

Treating cancer is more than just medicinal, the impact on yourself, your family, your near and dear ones is profound. This reaction is simply natural, given the fact that most of the information about cancer, the treatment, the effects, the costs are greatly exaggerated. It is important for the patient and their near and dear ones to continue their life as normally as possible, while you - the patient is being treated with the appropriate line of treatment, Your immediately family is provided with nessary emotional support in right measure to make living as normal as before.

UCC is your friend, guide and philosopher to assist you in the journey from cancer to no-cancer. We feel what you feel.

Universal Cancer Conquest LLP (UCC), is a specialist in Comprehensive Cancer Treatment & Care with registered office in Pune. UCC is committed to provide world-class multidisciplinary therapy for a wide range of cancers.

Universal Cancer Conquest (UCC) is designed for the welfare of cancer stricken people and every effort by each team member is aimed at making the road to recovery hassle-free. UCC strives to add more and more services, infrastructure and newer service to suit the needs of the patient's recovery process. The range of services offered by UCC includes Screening, Assessment, Surgery, Chemotherapy, Radiation, Psycho-social, Palliative care, Physiotherapy, Diet & Nutrition, Counselling, Prosthesis, Stoma, Pain Clinic, Nursing aid & Medical Social Work. UCC is about collaborative efforts of a knowledgeable team. A team that continually aggregates the available services in the city or anywhere in the world and guides the patient to get the right treatment.

Universal Cancer Conquest LLP (UCC) currently offers services in and around Pune.

Universal Cancer Conquest LLP (UCC) can be contacted by voice on 1800 833 0822 (from website). UCC may also be contacted via skype/email/facsimile/or a visit to any of UCC centers in Pune. Contact page
Making decisions about your cancer treatment can be very hard. Once you have discussed treatment options with your doctor, you may want to talk them over with your family or friends. Talking it over can help you sort out what option is right for you. Sometimes, your treatment might be aimed at alleviating or controlling symptoms rather than curing cancer.

Being told you have cancer, can be scary and stressful. You probably have a lot of questions, concerns and worries. Learning about the disease, how it’s treated, and is important to live through the path of recovery - a lot to do on your own and your near and dear ones.

Any website can give you general information about the cancer and its treatment, but your doctor and care-giving team is the best source of information about your situation. It’s important for you to be able to talk frankly and openly with your cancer-care team.

Here are some questions you can use to help you better understand your cancer and your options. Please ask until you understand. Ask additional questions too. Not all of these questions listed here may apply to you, but this list should help get started.

.
  • 1. Exactly what kind of cancer do I have?
  • 2. How do I get a copy of my pathology report?
  • 3. Where is the cancer located?
  • 4. Has the cancer spread beyond where it started?
  • 5. What’s the cancer’s stage? What does that mean?
  • 6. How does this affect my treatment options and long-term outcome (prognosis)?
  • 7. What are my chances of survival, based on my cancer as you see it?
  • 8. How much experience do you have treating this type of cancer?
  • 9. Will I need other tests before we can decide on treatment?
  • 10. What are my treatment choices?
  • 11. What treatment do you recommend and why?
  • 12. What’s the goal of my treatment?
  • 13. Should I think about genetic testing?
  • 14. Should I get a second opinion? How do I do that?
  • 15. Should I think about taking part in a clinical trial?
  • 1. What are the chances the cancer will come back after this treatment?
  • 2. What would we do if the treatment doesn’t work or if the cancer comes back?
  • 3. Will I be able to have children after treatment?
  • 4. How much will I have to pay for treatment? Will my insurance cover any of it?
  • 5. How long will treatment last? What will it involve?
  • 6. Where will treatment be done?
  • 7. What risks and side effects should I expect?
  • 8. What can I do to reduce the side effects of the treatment?
  • 9. How will treatment affect my daily activities?
  • 10. Will I be able to work during treatment?
  • 11. Will I lose my hair? If so, what can I do about it?
  • 12. Will the treatment hurt? Will I have any scars?

Once you have decided on treatment, you’ll need to know what to expect and what to look for. All of these questions may not apply to you, but asking the ones that do may be helpful.

  • 1. How will we know if the treatment is working?
  • 2. Is there anything I can do to help manage side effects?
  • 3. What symptoms or side effects should I tell you about right away?
  • 4. How can I reach you at night, or on holidays, or weekends?
  • 5. Do I need to change what I eat during treatment?
  • 6. Are there any limits on what I can do?
  • 7. What kind of exercise should I do, and how often?
  • 8. Can you suggest a mental health professional I can see if I start to feel overwhelmed, depressed, or distressed?
  • 9. Will I need special tests, such as imaging scans or blood tests, and how often?
  • 1. Do I need a special diet after treatment?
  • 2. Are there any physical / mental limits on what I can do?
  • 3. What kind of therapy/exercise should I do now?
  • 4. What type of follow-up will I need after treatment?
  • 5. How often will I need to have follow-up exams and imaging tests?
  • 6. What blood tests will I need? How often should I test?
  • 7. How will I know if the cancer has come back? What should I watch-out for?
  • 8. What are my options if the cancer comes back?

Ofcourse, the questions in this list are indicative and essential, however, along with the sample questions you’ve been given, be sure to ask any others you might have.